Hamas leader Yahya Sinwar is poking fun at Israel’s political instability.

“There is no negotiation between us and Israel. They do not have an active government, they do not have a cabinet to discuss major issues such as the Iranian threat. They cannot make decisive and fateful decisions at this time,” Sinwar said.

“We stand ready in front of the enemy and will not flinch. Our soldiers, our army and our regiments are ready to defend and respond,” he added.

Despite Sinwar’s scathing comments, the truth of the matter is that Israel is still in political turmoil.

Both Gantz and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu say they favor a national unity government. Together, Netanyahu’s Likud and Gantz’s Blue and White control a solid 65-seat majority. But the two are divided over who should lead the new government first, among other issues.

Netanyahu has insisted he head the government for the first two years, and that his right-wing and religious allies be included, conditions that Gantz has so far rejected.

Gantz met with Netanyahu in Tel Aviv last week but no progress was made.

`