German Chancellor Angela Merkel won the majority of votes in the general election but expressed concern over the rise of the AfD party, which will become the first far-right wing nationalistic party to hold seats in the Bundestag since the Second World War.







Angela Merkel will serve a fourth term

Angela Merkel will serve a fourth term Photo Credit: Reuters/Channel 2 News

The final election results are in as the last votes have been counted in Germany. Angela Merkel’s party received 33% of the vote and she will serve a fourth term as Germany’s Chancellor. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Merkel and congratulated her on her success.

Despite her successful outcome, Merkel admitted that the rise of the far-right wing nationalist party AfD worries her and that she hopes to win back the AfD voters. The Social Democratic Party won 20.5% while the AfD came in third with 12.5 % of the vote.

In her victory speech, Merkel said that she expected a better result. However, she stressed that “we are the strongest party, we have the mandate to build and create the next government, and a coalition cannot be built against us.”

Merkel stated that she wants to create a stable government for Germany. However, Social Democratic Party leader Martin Schulz has already announced that he will not be in Merkel’s government, explaining that a far-right wing party should not lead the opposition. “Our role is clear, we are the opposition party,” he said.







Angela Merkel

Angela Merkel Photo Credit: Sky News/Channel 2 News

Although Merkel won with results that far surpassed her opponents, she received significantly fewer seats compared to the previous election. With the rise of the far-right wing party, she will face challenges in trying to assemble a stable government.

Massive demonstrations took place yesterday in response to rise of AfD and the extreme-right. The far-right wing’s rise was the largest achievement for the AfD in its history, becoming the first far-right wing party to win seats in the parliament since the Second World War