An exciting find from Jerusalem was just unveiled by the Israel Museum: unique stone inscription dating to the Second Temple Period (first century CE), mentioning Jerusalem, written in Hebrew letters, and using the spelling as we know it today.

The inscription was found this last winter near the Jerusalem International Convention Center, during an excavation directed by the IAA’s Danit Levy, prior to the construction of a new road, undertaken and funded by Moriah – the Jerusalem Development Company and the Jerusalem Development Authority. 

During the excavations, the foundations of a Roman structure were exposed, which were supported by columns. The most important discovery was a stone column drum, reused in the Roman structure, upon which the Aramaic inscription appears, written in Hebrew letters typical of the Second Temple Period, around the time of Herod the Great’s reign. 

The unique inscription from Jerusalem as it was found in the excavation. (Danit Levy/ Israel Antiquities Authority)
The unique inscription from Jerusalem as it was found in the excavation. (Danit Levy/ Israel Antiquities Authority)

The inscription reads: ”Hananiah son of Dodalos of Jerusalem”

According to Dudy Mevorach, Chief Curator of Archaeology at the Israel Museum, “the archaeological context of the inscription does not allow us to determine where it was originally displayed, or who Hananiah son of Dodalos was”. 

”But it is likely that he was an artist-potter, the son of an artist-potter, who adopted a name from the Greek mythological realm, following Daedalus, the infamous artist. It is interesting that he decided to add his origin from nearby Jerusalem to his family name.” he said.

Source MFA