A special investigation team established for the fire that broke out at Haifa’s Oil Refinery plant on Sunday, concluded its investigation. The initial theory for the cause of the fire was a technical failure. Today, the report published points to human error.







Human error caused the gas tank to catch fire

Human error caused the gas tank to catch fire Photo Credit: Moment’s Reporting (Divuchai HaRegga)/Channel 2 News

The Coast District’s Fire Investigator published this evening (Tuesday) a report of his findings from the investigation into the fire that broke out on Sunday at the Haifa Oil Refineries. The investigator’s conclusion confirms what was already revealed by Channel 2 News to have been the cause: Human factors.

As previously reported by JOL, the Ministry of Environmental Protection announced yesterday (Monday), that a special inquiry team under the Green Police’s command to investigate the circumstances surrounding the fire’s outbreak has been established. Initially it was thought that the cause was a technical failure. However, investigators concluded that during a busy time at the refinery, a mistake was made: human error caused the fire.







Environmental organizations call for the factories to be closed

Environmental organizations call for the factories to be closed Photo Credit: Moment’s Reporting (Divuchai HaRegga)/Channel 2 News

Yesterday, a day after the first reports of the fire were received, 15 firefighting teams that worked all night were able to gain control of the blaze. A short while after the fire broke out, residents and members of environmental organizations protested the government and local authorities’ management. “An apocalyptic disaster occurred,” said The Green Course organization’s spokeswoman, Dr. Revital Goldschmidt to Channel 2 News Online.

“There is no place for toxic substances polluting factories in the Haifa bay, neither routine morbidity nor explosive disaster scenarios,” Goldschmidt continued. “We urge the Ministry to close the plant which has against it, six charges of environmental violations, and to conduct rigorous examinations of emergency protocols and common air pollution in all factories.”